Tue Aug 4 03:06:38 SGT 2015  
SINGAPORE
SEXUALHEALTH™
    Genital Warts
SINGAPORE SEXUALHEALTH™
HIV PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis): Stop HIV infection within 3 days after unprotected sex.
HIV test: 20 minute rapid test to accurately detect HIV infection 28 days after unprotected sex.
STD testing: Full & comprehensive sexually transmitted disease testing.

Genital Warts | SINGAPORE SEXUALHEALTH™

Summary

Genital Warts | SINGAPORE SEXUALHEALTH™ @singaporesexualhealth_com: Genital warts, Singapore. Private & confidential service.

Advertisement: Come to sunny Singapore to have your testing and treatment. Singapore Ministry of Health registered general practice (GP) clinic:
SHIM CLINIC
SINGAPORE SEXUALHEALTH™
168 Bedok South Avenue 3 #01-473
Singapore 460168
Tel: (+65) 6446 7446
Fax: (+65) 6449 7446
24hr Answering Tel: (+65) 6333 5550
Web: Genital Warts | SINGAPORE SEXUALHEALTH™
Opening Hours
Monday to Friday: 9 am to 3 pm, 7 pm to 11 pm
Saturday & Sunday: 7 pm to 11 pm
Public Holidays: Closed
Last registration: one hour before closing time.
Walk-in clinic. Appointments not required.
Bring NRIC, Work Pass or Passport for registration.

Description

Table of Contents

Genital warts: penile warts / vaginal warts / anal warts / anogenital warts / venereal warts / condyloma / condylomata acuminata / "cauliflower" sex disease.

References

Warts - on male sex organ Genital warts appear within 3 months after sexual contact with an infected person.

Genital warts:

  • are usually soft, pink cauliflower-like growths or flesh-coloured bumps on the sex organs
  • may also be hard and smooth
  • occur alone or in groups
  • tend to recur after treatment
  • increase the risk of cervical cancer in women.


Warts - on female sex organ An infected woman may infect her newborn during childbirth.

A person with genital warts can infect others through sexual contact.



Genital warts treatment / HPV treatment

HPV / human papillomavirus.

  • 120 known human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • 51 HPV types, and 3 subtypes are genital HPV as they infect the genital mucosa.
  • 31 genital HPV types are low risk
  • 6 genital HPV types are intermediate risk
  • 17 genital HPV types are high risk
They cause Genital HPV types, cancer risk, vaccine and test coverage
Type
Species
Risk
Cervarix
Gardasil
Gardasil-9
DigeneHR
DigenePS
CobasHPV
Digene
HybriBio
PapilloCheck
InnoLiPA
LinearArray
61 3 L ----------+-
72 3 L ----------+-
81 3 L -------+--+-
83 3 L ----------+-
84 3 L ----------+-
62 3 L ----------+-
CP6108 3 L ----------+-
71 15 L ---------++-
26 5 H ---------++-
51 5 H ---+-++++++-
69 5 H ---------++-
82 5 H --------+++-
IS39 5 H ----------+-
18 7 H +++++++++++-
39 7 H ---+-++++++-
45 7 H --+++++++++-
59 7 H ---+-++++++-
68 7 H ---+-++++++-
70 7 H --------+++-
53 6 H -------++++-
56 6 H ---+-++++++-
66 6 H -----+-++++-
54 13 L ---------++-
42 1 L ------+++-+-
40 8 L --------+++-
43 8 L ------++++--
6 10 L -++---+++++-
11 10 L -++---+++++-
44 10 L ------++++--
74 10 L ---------+--
16 9 H +++++++++++-
31 9 H --++-++++++-
33 9 H --++-++++++-
35 9 H ---+-++++++-
52 9 H --++-++++++-
58 9 H --++-++++++-
67 9 H ----------+-
73 11 H --------+++-

Legend: 71 (CP 8061), 73/MM9, 81 (CP 8304), 82 (MM4), 82 (IS 39), 83 (MM7), 84 (MM8), 89 (CP 6108)

References

Cervical cancer HPV vaccine (previously known as cervical cancer vaccine) types:
  • Gardasil® [HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant]
  • Cervarix® [HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Bivalent (Types 16 and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant]
  • V503 [HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Nonavalent (Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) Vaccine, Recombinant]
References Gardasil® [HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant] References Cervarix® [HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Bivalent (Types 16 and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant] References V503 [HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Nonavalent (Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) Vaccine, Recombinant] - to be released in 2013 STD vaccine / hepatitis vaccine shot/jab/injection to prevent some STDs

Vaccine Against Disease Age D
o
s
e
s
Dose schedule Price
per
dose
(SG$)
Havrix™ 1440 Adult Hepatitis A virus Hepatitis A ≥19y 2 m 0 & 6-12 $90/=
Twinrix® Hepatitis A virus
Hepatitis B virus
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
1-15y 2 m 0, 6-12 $135/=
≥16y 3 m 0, 1, 6
4 d 0, 7, 21 & m 12
Inactivated / Fractional / Protein / Subunit / Recombinant
Engerix™-B 20 μg Hepatitis B virus Hepatitis B 11-15y 2 m 0, & 6 $50/=
≥20y 3 m 0, 1, & 6
4 m 0, 1, 2, & 12 or
d 0, 7, 21 & m 12
Gardasil® HPV
types 6, 11, 16, & 18
Genital warts
Cervical cancer
9-26y 3 m 0, 2, & 6 or
m 0, 1, & 4
$195/=
Cervarix® HPV
types 16, & 18
(31, 33, & 45)
10-25y 3 m 0, 1, & 6
m 0, 1, & 5
m 0, 2½, 12
$195/=
V503 HPV
types 6, 11, 16, 18,
31, 33, 45,
52, & 58
3 m 0, 2, & 6 or
m 0, 1, & 4
$???/=

HPV test for men/women.

  • Digene® High-Risk HPV DNA Test
  • Digene® HPV DNA Test
  • Digene® HPV Genotyping PS Test
  • Hybribio®
    • HPV GenoArray Test Kit
    • Detects 15 high-risk HPV types: 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68. And 6 low-risk HPV types: 6, 11, 42, 43, 44, CP8304
    • Able to differentiate which types are positive.
    • May be available in Singapore soon.
  • Cobas® HPV Test
    • Cobas® HPV Test
    • Detects 14 high-risk HPV types: 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68
    • The test specifically identifies (types) HPV 16 and HPV 18, while concurrently detecting the rest of the high risk types (31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68)
    • Cost is SG$200/=
  • LINEAR ARRAY® HPV Genotyping Test
    • LINEAR ARRAY® HPV Genotyping Test
    • Identifies 37 high-risk HPV genotypes 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68, 73 (MM9), 82 (MM4) low-risk HPV genotypes 6, 11, 26, 40, 42, 53, 54, 55, 61, 62, 64, 67, 69, 70, 71, 72, 81, 83 (MM7), 84 (MM8), IS39, and CP6108
  • INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra
    • INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra
    • Identifies 15 high-risk HPV genotypes (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 68, 73, 82) 3 probable high-risk HPV genotypes (26, 53, 66) 7 low-risk HPV genotypes (6, 11, 40, 43, 44, 54, 70) and some additional types (69, 71, 74).
  • PapilloCheck®
    • PapilloCheck®
    • Identifies 24 hiv-risk HPV types 16 18 31 33 35 39 45 51 52 53 56 58 59 66 68 70 73 82 and low-risk HPV types 6 11 40 42 43 44

Sexual risk (of HIV/STD/pregnancy), and what you can do before and after exposure.

Timeline HIV STD Pregnancy
Before exposure
Abstain from sex, Be faithful, or Condom use
Circumcision (males only)
Contraception (females only)
HIV PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) STD vaccine:
- Hepatitis vaccine
- HPV vaccine
STD / HIV exposure
Unsafe sex / unprotected sex:
No condom / Condom broke / Condom slip
0-72 hours HIV prevention
HIV PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) treatment
- Stop HIV infection after exposure.
STD testing.
If STD symptoms appear, then do STD treatment.
- Males: Do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving.
- Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating.
Emergency contraception (females only)
2 weeks HIV DNA PCR test
1 month 20 minute rapid HIV test - SD Bioline HIV Ag/Ab Combo:
- Fingerprick blood sampling.
3 months 20 minute rapid HIV test - OraQuick®:
- Oral saliva or
- Fingerprick blood sampling.
Full & comprehensive STD testing
- Males: Do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving.
- Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating.

References


Latest News

Saliva-Based Screening of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Strains: Detection in Female Indonesian and Thai Dental Students.
Sun, 02 Aug 2015 09:29:01 +0100 | Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
CONCLUSIONS: This study successfully detected presence of HPV16 and HPV18 DNA in a number of saliva samples from female dental school students. Marital status, experience of sexual intercourse and safe sexual practice are related to the possibility of finding HPV DNA finding in saliva. Dentists, physicians and other health care professionals may gain significant value from the findings of this study, which provide an understanding of the nature of HPV infection and its risk to patient health and disease.

Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution among Thai Women with High-Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Lesions and Invasive Cervical Cancer: a Literature Review.
Sun, 02 Aug 2015 09:29:01 +0100 | Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
Authors: Kietpeerakool C, Kleebkaow P, Srisomboon J

Prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and human papillomavirus in a sexual health clinic setting in urban Sri Lanka
Sat, 01 Aug 2015 00:00:00 +0100 | International Journal of STD and AIDS
The prevalences of Trichomonas vaginalis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and human papillomavirus (HPV) in Sri Lanka are not well reported; the objective of this study is to describe the prevalences of these four sexually transmitted infections among attendees of sexual health clinic in an urban setting. Vaginal swabs were collected from consenting women attending a sexual health clinic and tested for the presence of the above sexually transmitted infections using nucleic acid amplification techniques. Basic demographic details were sought from each participant (483 women of age range 14–61, median 30 years, IQR 12 years) via a research assistant–administered questionnaire. Overall, a prevalence of T. vaginalis, C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae and HPV was 2.3%, (9...

Successful treatment of genital Bowen's disease with imiquimod 5% cream
Sat, 01 Aug 2015 00:00:00 +0100 | International Journal of STD and AIDS
A 64-year-old Japanese woman was diagnosed as having Bowen’s disease on the vulva. The histopathological findings revealed papillomatosis, koilocytosis and clumping cells with atypical nuclei. Human papillomavirus DNA was not detected on polymerase chain reaction using consensus primers. The lesion was successfully treated with topical imiquimod 5% cream after two months. Histopathologically, no atypical cells were observed after treatment. Imiquimod can be a potential treatment modality for lesions that are difficult to treat with surgical excision. (Source: International Journal of STD and AIDS)

Simple Mouth Rinse Could Help Predict Recurrence of HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancers
Sat, 01 Aug 2015 00:00:00 +0100 | National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Oropharyngeal cancer patients who were found to have detectable traces of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) in their saliva following cancer treatment are at an increased risk for recurrence, a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found.

Combined ultrasound-curcumin treatment of human cervical cancer cells
Sat, 01 Aug 2015 00:00:00 +0100 | European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
The objectives were: (1) to study ultrasound enhancement of curcumin effects on HeLa, SiHa and C33A, (2) to compare two frequencies for sonoporation and (3) to detect cell-free DNA released by the treatment.Study design: HeLa, SiHa and C33A cells (non-HPV control) were processed and exposed to either: (1) 10μM curcumin only, (2) 10μM curcumin with 8 secs of 7.5MHz ultrasound, (3) 10μM curcumin with 8 secs of 5.0MHz ultrasound, (4) control medium, or (5) 8 secs of 7.5MHz ultrasound. (Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology)

HPV Vaccines: their pathology-based discovery, benefits, and adverse effects
Sat, 01 Aug 2015 00:00:00 +0100 | Annals of Diagnostic Pathology
The discovery of the HPV vaccine illustrates the power of in situ based pathologic analysis in better understanding and curing diseases. The two available HPV vaccines have markedly reduced the incidence of CINs, genital warts, and cervical cancer throughout the world. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, healthcare officials, and parents to refuse providing the recommended vaccination to the target population. Aims: discuss the discovery of HPV vaccine; review scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines. (Source: Annals of Diagnostic Pathology)

If you could protect your child from cancer with a vaccine, would you have them get it?
Fri, 31 Jul 2015 21:31:00 +0100 | Pediatric Health Associates
According to the National Institute of Health (NIH) viruses such as Epstein-Barr, HPV, Hepatitis B and Herpes Virus-8 can cause cancer.   Most parents have no problem having their child vaccinated for Hep B but many parents struggle with the HPV vaccine.   Statistically, one out of every 2 teens is sexually active. Every 20 minutes of every day someone is diagnosed with an HPV related cancer! 6 million HPV infections are diagnosed every year with the vast majority being found in young people.    The vaccine can be given as young as 9 years of age but is recommended between 11 and 12.  Antibodies in the vaccine are more robust in children of that age then those who are 16 years and older.  It is important for kids to get the vaccine before they b...

Oregon has a low STD vaccination rate
Fri, 31 Jul 2015 20:58:46 +0100 | bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines
Oregon is about average in the U.S. when it comes to vaccinating adolescents against human papillomavirus, or HPV, but many teens still aren’t getting vaccinated, and that puts them at risk for cancer of the cervix, among other cancers.

Many Adolescents Still Not Getting HPV Vaccine
Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:00:55 +0100 | PHPartners.org
The number of 13- to 17-year-old boys and girls getting the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine increased slightly for the second year in a row, according to data from CDC's 2014 National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen), published in this week's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). (Source: PHPartners.org)